Victorian Preservation Association - Not Just Victorians, But All Vintage Homes

Historic House Museums in Louisiana

We try to keep this list of historic house museums for Louisiana current, but it is best to check directly with the museums for their hours and other information. If you know of a historic house museum in Louisiana that should be listed here, please use our submission form to let us know about it.

Alexandria

Image Needed for ID: 502

Kent Plantation House

3601 Bayou Rapides Road
Alexandria, LA  71303
Phone: (318) 487-5998

Year Built: 1796
Admission Price: See their website
Hours: See their website

Kent House is a classic example of French colonial architecture. Standing on the original land grant from the King of Spain to Pierre Baillio II, it offers a glimpse of the French, Spanish and American cultures that have influenced Louisiana. All three flags fly over the entrance.

Baton Rouge

Image Needed for ID: 503

Magnolia Mound Plantation

2161 Nicholson Drive
Baton Rouge, LA  70802
Phone: (225) 343-4955

Year Built: 1791
Admission Price: Adults $10, Seniors & Students $8, Children $4
Hours: 10am-4pm Mon-Sat, 1-4pm Sun

BREC's Magnolia Mound Plantation is a rare survivor of the vernacular architecture influenced by early settlers from France and the West Indies. This venerable landmark is unique in southern Louisiana not simply because of its age, quality of restoration, or outstanding collections, but because it is still a vital part of the community.

Image Needed for ID: 504

Old Governor's Mansion

502 North Boulevard
Baton Rouge, LA  70802
Phone: (225) 387-2464

Year Built: 1929
Admission Price: Adults $7, Seniors $6, Students $5
Hours: 10am-4pm Tue-Fri

This is the second Governor's Mansion to occupy the site. The first Governor's Mansion, a large frame house built for Baton Rouge businessman Nathan King Knox, served as the official residence of Louisiana Governors from 1887 until 1929, when it was razed and the present Old Governor's Mansion was built. The building cost almost $150,000 to complete, and, at a cost of $22,000 (a princely sum for the time), the Mansion was furnished with the finest damask and velvet drapes, crystal chandeliers, hand-printed French wallpaper, and other fine appointments.

Destrehan

Image Needed for ID: 505

Destrehan Plantation

13034 River Road
Destrehan, LA  70047
Phone: (985) 764-9315 • Toll Free: (877) 453-2095

Year Built: 1787
Admission Price: Adults $18, Children $7
Hours: 9am-4pm daily

Established in 1787, Destrehan is the oldest documented plantation home in the lower Mississippi Valley. She has survived colonial and civil wars and the perils of time, but with dedication, has now been preserved in all its glory for you to enjoy.

Franklin

Image Needed for ID: 506

Grevemberg House

407 Sterling Road
Franklin, LA  70538
Phone: (337) 828-2092

Year Built: 1851
Admission Price: Adults $10, Seniors & Students $8, Children $5
Hours: 10am-4pm daily

The 1851 home was saved and meticulously restored by the St. Mary Landmarks Society. It is a magnificent example of Greek Revival-style architecture with its fluted Corinthian columns, upper and lower galleries opening into spacious entrance halls and adjoining double parlors.

Garyville

Image Needed for ID: 507

San Francisco Plantation House

2646 Hwy. 44
Garyville, LA  70051
Phone: (985) 535-2341 • Toll Free: (888) 322-1756

Year Built: 1853
Admission Price: Adults $15, Students $10
Hours: See their website

San Francisco Plantation House, the most oppulent plantation house in North America, is located on the east bank of the Mississippi River less than 40 minutes from New Orleans, Louisiana. It is a galleried house of the Creole open suite style, nestled under centuries old Live Oaks and contains one of the finest antique collections in the country.

Houma

Image Needed for ID: 508

Southdown Plantation and Museum

1208 Museum Drive
Houma, LA  70360
Phone: (985) 851-0154

Year Built: 1859
Admission Price: Adults $6, Seniors $5, Children $3
Hours: 10am-4pm Tue-Sat

Southdown Plantation House is a 19th-century sugar manor house and home to the Terrebonne Museum of history and culture. It was built in 1859 as a one-story Greek Revival house by sugar planter William J. Minor. His son, Henry C. Minor, added the second floor and Victorian-style architectural features in 1893.

Jackson

Image Needed for ID: 509

Centenary State Historic Site

3522 College St
Jackson, LA  70748
Phone: (225) 634-7925

Year Built:
Admission Price: Adults $4
Hours: 9am-5pm Tue-Sat

A restored professor's residence is on the grounds of Centenary College.

Lafayette

Image Needed for ID: 510

Vermilionville Living History Museum

300 Fisher Road
Lafayette, LA  70508
Phone: (337) 233-4077

Year Built:
Admission Price: Adults $10, Seniors $8, Students $6
Hours: 10am-4pm Tue-Sun

Vermilionville authentically portrays a way of life preserved with a distinctly French accent. Situated on the banks of the Bayou Vermilion, this Cajun/Creole heritage and folklife park recreates life in the Acadiana area between 1765 and 1890. The beautiful grounds, which are laid out as an historic village, contain eighteen structures, including six restored original homes. In most of the structures, costumed interpreters demonstrate traditional crafts or musical styles.

Melrose

Image Needed for ID: 511

Melrose

3533 State Hwy. 119
Melrose, LA 
Phone: (318) 379-0055

Year Built: 1796
Admission Price: Adults $10, Students $5
Hours: 10am-5pm Tue-Sun

Melrose began life as The Louis Metoyer Plantation in 1796 and was named Melrose in 1884 when Joseph Henry bought the plantation. It is one of the first and is one of the best surviving examples of a Creole plantation built by former enslaved persons known as "free people of color." There are out- buildings from the late 1700's, one of which houses the 1955 murals painted by the internationally known African-American Folk Artist, Clementine Hunter, who lived and worked at Melrose.

New Iberia

Image Needed for ID: 512

Shadows on the Teche

317 E. Main Street
New Iberia, LA  70560
Phone: (337) 369-6446 • Toll Free: (877) 200-4924

Year Built: 1831
Admission Price: Adults $10, Seniors $8, Students $6.50
Hours: 9am-4:30pm Mon-Sat

A white-columned brick building constructed between 1831 and 1834 by sugar planter David Weeks and his wife, the Shadows is both a survivor and a reminder of another time. It is a tangible link to the past, representing over 150 years of history, stories about people and events, about life.

New Orleans

Image Needed for ID: 514

Gallier House

1132 Royal Street
New Orleans, LA  70156
Phone: (504) 526-5661

Year Built: 1857
Admission Price: See their website
Hours: See their website

In 1857, esteemed New Orleans architect, James Gallier, Jr., put his considerable talent to work designing a residence of his own. Gallier House is an outstanding example of accurate and comprehensive historic restoration of one of New Orleans’ loveliest and time-honored landmarks.

Image Needed for ID: 515

Hermann-Grima House

820 Saint Louis Street
New Orleans, LA  70156
Phone: (504) 525-5661

Year Built: 1831
Admission Price: See their website
Hours: See their website

Built in 1831, by a German Jewish immigrant, Samuel Hermann, who amassed his fortune in the cotton market, Hermann-Grima House is one of the most significant residences in New Orleans. This handsome Federal mansion with its courtyard garden boasts the only horse stable and functional 1830s outdoor kitchen in the French Quarter. The outdoor hearth kitchen, with its view of the antique roses, citrus and parterre gardens, provides a dynamic experience for our visitors.

Image Needed for ID: 516

Longue Vue House and Gardens

7 Bamboo Road
New Orleans, LA  70124
Phone: (504) 488-5488

Year Built: 1939
Admission Price: See their website
Hours: See their website

Longue Vue House and Gardens was designed and built between 1939 and1942 for Edgar and Edith Stern and their three children by landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman and architects William and Geoffrey Platt. Shipman, the Platt brothers, and the Sterns worked closely together to create a masterpiece of utility and beauty uniting the house and gardens. Consisting of a main house, 8 dependencies, 5 structures, 15 garden areas, and 22 fountains and ponds located on an eight-acre site, Longue Vue House and Gardens is one of the last Country Place Era homes built in the United States.

Image Needed for ID: 517

Madame John's Legacy

632 Dumaine St
New Orleans, LA  70116
Phone: (504) 568-6968 • Toll Free: (800) 568-6968

Year Built: 1789
Admission Price: Contact Museum
Hours: Closed until further notice

Madame John's is an excellent example of Louisiana Creole residential design at the end of the 18th century. Because of its fine architectural character, it has been designated as an official National Historic Landmark. The architectural complex at Madame John's actually consists of three buildings: The main house, the kitchen with cook's quarters and the two-story garconniere.

Image Needed for ID: 513

The 1850 House

523 St. Ann St
New Orleans, LA  70116
Phone: (504) 568-6968 • Toll Free: (800) 568-6968

Year Built: 1850
Admission Price: Adults $3, Students & Seniors $2
Hours: 10am-4:30pm Tue-Sun

The Upper and Lower Pontalba Buildings, which line the St. Ann and St. Peter Street sides of Jackson Square, were built in 1850 by the Baroness Micaela Almonester de Pontalba, the daughter of Don Andres Almonester y Roxas, the Spanish colonial landowner associated with the neighboring Cabildo, Cathedral and Presbytere. Inspired by the imposing Parisian architecture the Baroness favored, the distinctive rowhouses were intended to serve as both elegant residences and fine retail establishments. In 1921 the Pontalba family sold the Lower Pontalba Building to philanthropist William Ratcliff Irby who subsequently, in 1927, bequeathed it to the State Museum.

Image Needed for ID: 518

The Historic New Orleans Collection

533 Royal Street
New Orleans, LA  70130
Phone: (504) 523-4662

Year Built: 1889
Admission Price: See their website
Hours: See their website

In a complex of historic French Quarter buildings, The Collection operates a museum, which includes the Williams Gallery for changing exhibitions and the Louisiana History Galleries, (ten galleries showcasing permanent displays tracing Louisiana’s multifaceted past); the Williams Residence (a house museum); a museum shop; and administrative offices. The Williams Research Center at 410 Chartres Street, which opened in 1996, makes available to researchers The Collection’s holdings which comprise some 35,000 library items, more than two miles of documents and manuscripts, and approximately 350,000 photographs, prints, drawings, paintings, and other artifacts.

Newellton

Image Needed for ID: 519

Winter Quarters State Historic Site

4929 Highway 608
Newellton, LA  71357
Phone: () -

Year Built: 1805
Admission Price: Contact Museum
Hours: Closed for tornado repairs

In 1805, Job Routh built a winter hunting lodge on a Spanish land grant located on the Mississippi River flood plain in what would become Tensas Parish. During the early 1830s, Routh's heirs added several more rooms and a gallery. Dr. Haller Nutt and his wife Julia (granddaughter of Job Routh) bought the property in 1850 and began the final phase of construction, which gives Winter Quarters Planatation is distinctive look.

St. Francisville

Image Needed for ID: 520

Audubon State Historic Site

11788 Highway 965
St. Francisville, LA  70775
Phone: (225) 635-3739 • Toll Free: (888) 677-2838

Year Built: 1806
Admission Price: Adults $4
Hours: 9am-5pm daily

The tall, airy house where John James Audubon stayed is a splendid example of colonial architecture adapted to its climate. Built circa 1806, Oakley predates the relatively heavy details of classic revival in Southern plantation homes and claims distinction for its beautiful simplicity. The rooms of Oakley have been restored in the style of the late Federal Period (1790-1830), reflecting their appearance when Audubon stayed there.

Image Needed for ID: 521

Rosedown Plantation State Historic Site

12501 Highway 10
St. Francisville, LA  70775
Phone: (225) 635-3332

Year Built: 1834
Admission Price: Adults $10, Seniors $8, Students $4
Hours: 9am-5pm daily

Daniel and Martha Turnbull began construction on the main house at Rosedown in 1834, completing it by May the following year. The home was furnished with the finest pieces available, most imported from the North and from Europe. A surprising amount of the furnishings purchased by the Turnbulls remained with the house during the years after the Civil War and many original pieces are still on display at Rosedown.

St. Martinville

Image Needed for ID: 522

Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Site

1200 N. Main Street
St. Martinville, LA  70582
Phone: (337) 394-3754

Year Built: 1815
Admission Price: Adults $4
Hours: 9am-5pm Tue-Sat

When the grant was sold and subdivided, this section was developed as an indigo plantation. In the early 1800s, Pierre Olivier Duclozel de Vezin, a wealthy Creole, acquired this property to raise cotton, cattle, and eventually, sugarcane. He built the Maison Olivier, the circa 1815 plantation house which is the central feature of Longfellow-Evangeline SHS. His son, Charles, made improvements to the home in the 1840s. The structure is an excellent example of a Raised Creole Cottage, a simple and distinctive architectural form which shows a mixture of Creole, Caribbean, and French influences.

Thibodaux

Image Needed for ID: 523

E. D. White Historic Site

2295 LA. Hwy 1
Thibodaux, LA  70301
Phone: (985) 447-0915

Year Built:
Admission Price: Free
Hours: 10am-4:30pm Tue-Sun

Historians date the construction of the plantation home anywhere from the late eighteenth century to the 1830's due to the evidence of contrasting architectural features found within the house. The house more prominently represents the Creole-style cottage design that was popular in south Louisiana prior to the Civil war, but was transformed into a Greek Revival house in the 1840's, reflecting the impact of Anglo-American culture on the Acadian Bayou landscape in the mid 1800s.

Vacherie

Image Needed for ID: 524

Oak Alley Plantation

3645 Highway 18
Vacherie, LA  70090
Phone: (225) 265-2151

Year Built: 1839
Admission Price: See their website
Hours: See their website

The quarter-mile canopy of giant live oak trees, believed to be nearly 300 years old, forms an impressive avenue leading to the classic Greek-revival style antebellum home.

Victorian Preservation Association - P.O. Box 586 - San Jose, CA 95106-0586 - Email:info@vpa.org

Facebook

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional