We try to keep this list of historic house museums for Georgia current, but it is best to check directly with the museums for their hours and other information.

If you know of a historic house museum not in our list, please submit it.

If you are the director of a museum in our listings and you would like to claim your listing so you are able to maintain your listing yourself, please email us at info@vpa.org and we will set you up.

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Brazell House

    The Altama Museum of Art & History is housed in the 1911 Brazell House, designed and built for the Crawford W. Brazell family by noted architect-builder Ivey Crutchfield. Large columns, multi-hipped rooflines and grand porches define the exterior of the neoclassical home. Read More

    Andalusia Farms

      Andalusia was the home of American author Flannery O'Connor from 1951 until her death from lupus in 1964. This family farm was where O'Connor was living when she completed her two novels and two collections of short stories. Visitors to the farm can tour the main house and see several outbuildings. Most of the furniture and furnishings are original… Read More

      Low House

        In 1847 the wealthy cotton factor Andrew Low chose John Norris to design a house on the lot for his young family. Norris was an architect to whom the city's leading citizens turned for the design of their residences and business establishments. Along with the architects William Jay and Charles B. Cluskey, John Norris formed a trio which left… Read More

        Barrington Hall

          The home of Barrington King who with his father, Roswell King, co-founded the town of Roswell, GA. The Greek Revival Temple Form home has been lovingly restored and contains many original family possessions. The seven acres of grounds feature the only public antebellum garden in metro Atlanta Read More

          Cravens House

            The park includes three historic homes. Brotherton House marks the spot where the Union line was broken, Snodgrass House served as a Union field hospital, and Cravens House served as a Conferderate field hospital. Read More

            Chief Vann House

              During the 1790s, James Vann became a Cherokee Indian leader and wealthy businessman. He established the largest and most prosperous plantation in the Cherokee Nation, covering 1,000 acres of what is now Murray County. In 1804 he completed construction of a beautiful 2 ½-story brick home that was the most elegant in the Cherokee Nation. After Vann was murdered… Read More

              Davenport-House

                Completed circa 1820 by Isaiah Davenport, this historic home marked the beginning of Savannah's historic preservation movement. Throughout its 50+ years as a historic site, the Davenport House Museum has treated visitors to intriguing and vivid experiences centered on a legendary Savannah-centric tale of courage and determination. Read More

                Hills and Dales

                  Designed by Hentz and Reid for textile magnate Fuller E. Callaway, this Italian villa home is the centerpiece of a 35 acre estate which blends with formal boxwood gardens. Read More

                  Hay House

                    The 18,000-square-foot mansion spans four levels and is crowned by a three-story cupola. Commissioned by imaginative owners and constructed by the most skillful workers of the time, its technological amenities were unsurpassed in the mid-19th century: hot and cold running water, central heat, a speaker-tube system, in-house kitchen and an elaborate ventilation system. Read More

                    Old Governor's Mansion

                      Completed in 1839, the Old Governor's Mansion is one of the finest examples of High Greek Revival architecture in the nation. Designed by noted architect Charles Clusky, an Irish immigrant, and built by Timothy Porter of Farmington, Connecticut, the Mansion looms over Milledgeville with its stately columns and imposing facade. Read More

                      Rhodes Hall

                        Rhodes Hall, one of Atlanta’s few remaining mansions on Peachtree Street, is located just north of Pershing Point. Built in 1904, prior to the development of Ansley Park, Rhodes Hall was designed by one of Atlanta’s most celebrated young architects for one of the city’s wealthiest men. Constructed of Stone Mountain granite in the Romanesque Revival style, it holds… Read More

                        Woodrow Wilson Boyhood Home

                          The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson was built in 1859 by local stove merchant, Aaron H. Jones, a native of Eastport, Maine. Jones, however, never occupied the house, selling it when it was new for $10,000 in February, 1860 to the Trustees of the First Presbyterian Church. Read More

                          Wilson Boyhood Home

                            The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson was built in 1859 by local stove merchant, Aaron H. Jones, a native of Eastport, Maine. Jones, however, never occupied the house, selling it when it was new for $10,000 in February, 1860 to the Trustees of the First Presbyterian Church. The Wilsons lived in the house for almost eleven years, witnessing… Read More

                            Harper-Fowlkes House

                              Antebellum mansion with an 1890's top floor addition, this home is filled with beautiful antiques, and tells the story of an old Savannah family, the Champions and the McAlpins, as well at the life of early preservationist Alida Harper Fowlkes. The home has a beautiful garden that is rented for events. Read More

                              Wadsworth-Longfellow House

                                Within its walls lived three generations of one remarkable family that made significant contributions to the political, literary, and cultural life of New England and the United States. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882), grew up in the house and went on to become one of the most famous men of his time. Read More